State Route 32, 33, 34 and 39 in Kansas

By | October 26, 2022

State Route 32 in Kansas

SR-32
Begin Lawrence
End Kansas City
Length 32 mi
Length 52 km
Route
Lawrence

Linwood

Bonner Springs

Kansas City

According to ablogtophone, State Route 32, also known as K-32 is a state route in the U.S. state of Kansas. The road forms an east-west route in the east of the state, from Lawrence to Kansas City. K-32 is 52 kilometers long.

Travel directions

Just northeast of the city of Lawrence, K-32 branches off from US 24 and then crosses the Kansas Turnpike (I-70) with no connection. The road is a single carriageway and leads through rural areas that are gradually becoming slightly exurba – ting west of the Kansas City metropolitan area. The road follows the Kansas River eastwards and enters the Kansas City urban area. The first larger town is Bonner Springs, where one crosses K-7, after which the road is equipped with 4 to 5 lanes, partly with center turn lane. One crosses I-435, followed by I-635. K-32 then ends at US 69 in Kansas City.

History

K-32 has traditionally been one of two routes between Lawrence and Kansas City, US 24 running slightly more north was the original highway, later followed by the Kansas Turnpike (I-70) from the 1950s. K-32 originally ran north on Park Drive and Central Avenue in Kansas City. In 1916, the first bridge over the Kansas River, part of Kansas Avenue, opened. This was replaced in 1988 by the current bridge. A little further west, K-32 also crosses the Kansas River, where a bridge has spanned the river since 1955. K-32 did not originally use these bridges to get into Kansas City, but stayed north of the Kansas River.

Traffic intensities

K-32 is a quiet road outside Kansas City with only 2,000 to 3,000 vehicles per day between Lawrence and Bonner Springs. In the urban area of ‚Äč‚ÄčKansas City, the road with 10,000 to 15,000 vehicles isn’t exactly busy for a four-lane road, either.

State Route 33 in Kansas

SR-33
Get started Peoria
End palmyra
Length 11 mi
Length 17 km
Route
Wellsville

According to beautyphoon, State Route 33, also known as K-33 is a state route in the U.S. state of Kansas. The road forms a short north-south route in the east of the state, the only place on the route being Wellsville. K-33 is 17 kilometers long.

Travel directions

K-33 forms a north-south route between K-68 and US 56. The only place on the route is the village of Wellsville, which connects to Interstate 35. The area is agricultural and has many farms and scattered buildings. On the southern part of the route, K-33 jumps slightly to the east once. The rest of the route is straight and two-lane.

History

K-33 was originally more of an east-west route along which I-35 was later built. It ran from Edgerton via Wellsville and Ottawa to Waverly. In 1936, the eastern starting point was changed to north of Wellsville, and the southern terminus at K-68. The rest was then renumbered as US 50S, creating the current north-south route. In 1940 the area north of Wellsville was paved and in 1950 south of Wellsville.

Traffic intensities

Every day, 1,500 to 2,300 vehicles drive between K-68 to I-35 and 4,400 vehicles through Wellsville. This drops to 1,500 vehicles north of Wellsville to US 56.

State Route 34 in Kansas

SR-34
Begin Ashland
End Bucklin
Length 29 mi
Length 47 km
Route
Bucklin

State Route 34 or K-34 is a state route in the U.S. state of Kansas. The road forms a north-south route through sparsely populated southwest Kansas, from near Ashland to north of Bucklin. K-34 is 47 kilometers long.

Travel directions

K-34 begins 10 kilometers east of the village of Ashland at the intersection with US 160 and is actually an extension of US 183, which turns east here. K-34 heads due north through barren prairie land. Bucklin, 40 kilometers to the north, is the only place on the route, and there are no significant road crossings on that stretch. Bucklin is a small town on US 54. From Bucklin, K-34 continues a little further northwest and ends at an intersection with US 400.

History

K-34 originally ran in another part of Kansas. Between 1926 and 1937 the road ran from Neodesha to Thayer. This was renumbered K-37 in 1937, allowing the number to be assigned to the current region. Originally, however, K-34 ran further east, through the village of Protection. In 1965, the current highway between US 160/183 and Bucklin was opened and renumbered K-34.

Traffic intensities

Only 500 to 700 vehicles travel daily on K-34 south of Bucklin and 1,000 vehicles between Bucklin and US 400.

State Route 39 in Kansas

SR-39
Get started Fredonia
End Fort Scott
Length 65 mi
Length 105 km
Route
Benedict

buffalo

Chanute

Porterville

State Route 39, also known as K-39 is a state route in the U.S. state of Kansas. The road forms an east-west route in the southeast of the state, from near Fredonia to near Fort Scott. K-39 is 105 kilometers long.

Travel directions

K-39 begins northwest of Fredonia at an intersection with US 400 and then heads east. The road leads over rolling prairies with sometimes wooded riverbeds. The area is quite sparsely populated, the only place directly on the route is the town of Chanute. Near Buffalo there is a short double numbering with US 75 and in Chanute there is a grade separated connection with US 169. K-39 is largely a four-lane road through Chanute, but is a two-lane road elsewhere. One way east of Chanute is double numbered with US 59. The road then ends southwest of Fort Scott on K-7.

History

K-39 has been around since 1926 on more or less the current route, with minor adjustments from the current route. For example, K-39 originally started in Fredonia and ran north before reaching the current east-west route. Also, K-39 ran to Fort Scott in a different way, via a northern route. In 1932 only a few kilometers at Chanute had been asphalted. The connection to US 400 west of Fredonia was built in the 1930s, but was not yet part of K-39. In the first half of the 1940s, the first parts of K-39 outside Chanute were asphalted, such as west and east of Chanute. K-39 has also continued south for some time from Fredonia, to US 160 in Elk City. The part east of Chanute has also been part of US 59. for some timebeen. In the first half of the 1950s, the remaining parts of K-39 were asphalted. Only later was K-39 south of Fredonia deleted, this is no longer a state highway.

Traffic intensities

Every day, 1,000 vehicles travel between US 400 and US 75 and 2,000 vehicles continue to Chanute. This drops to 1,500 vehicles east of Chanute to US 59 and only 400 vehicles on the easternmost portion of US 59 to K-7 southwest of Fort Scott.

State Route 39 in Kansas